• Thanks to our funding support:

    Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
    Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
    National Institute of Health (NIH)
    Canada Research Chairs
    Leukemia Lymphoma Society of Canada
    SGC

  • Thanks to our funding support:

    Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
    Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
    National Institute of Health (NIH)
    Canada Research Chairs
    Leukemia Lymphoma Society of Canada
    SGC


  • Thanks to our funding support:

    Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR)
    Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC)
    National Institute of Health (NIH)
    Canada Research Chairs
    Leukemia Lymphoma Society of Canada
    SGC


  • About Us:

    The Arrowsmith lab studies epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease using structural and chemical biology.
    LEARN MORE

    Information about research training opportunities can be found HERE.


  • About Us:

    The Arrowsmith lab studies epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease using structural and chemical biology.
    LEARN MORE

    Information about research training opportunities can be found HERE.


  • About Us:

    The Arrowsmith lab studies epigenetic mechanisms in health and disease using structural and chemical biology.
    LEARN MORE

    Information about research training opportunities can be found HERE.

Welcome to Arrowsmith Laboratory


We are an interdisciplinary lab studying the structure, function and chemical modulation of proteins involved in epigenetics and nuclear signalling – cellular mechanisms that are disrupted in cancer and other diseases. We use structural biology and chemical biology approaches to understand how transcriptional and chromatin regulatory proteins recognize, interact with and signal to other molecular components of the cell.


In conjunction with the Structural Genomics Consortium (SGC), we are using our protein structural information to develop new chemical genetic tools to define, perturb and manipulate essential functions of proteins involved in methylation dependent signalling. In this regard, our lab is involved in developing potent, selective and cell-active inhibitors of methyltransfeases, and proteins that recognize and bind to methylated proteins and nucleic acids.


We are using these "chemical probes" to study the roles of their target proteins in normal biology and to assess their therapeutic potential in human disease, including cancer and inflammatory bowel disease.